skip to main content
Washington State Institute for Public Policy
- Remove
- Remove
- Remove
From To
+ Add new line

Publications

Found 1 results

Postsecondary Program Participation and Completion Patterns Among Individuals Incarcerated in Washington State Prisons

Open Publication PDF

Lauren Knoth, Danielle Fumia - June 2021

Washington’s Department of Corrections (DOC) and State Board of Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) collaborate to provide educational programming to incarcerated individuals and formerly incarcerated individuals re-entering the community. Available educational programming includes adult basic education, workforce and vocational training, and Associate of Arts degrees, among other options.

In 2020, the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC), in partnership with DOC and SBCTC, received a grant from the Lumina Foundation to improve postsecondary credential outcomes for incarcerated and re-entering populations in Washington. As a part of this grant, the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) was contracted by WSAC to examine the landscape of postsecondary correctional education programs in Washington.

This study presents an overview of the postsecondary correctional education system in Washington, with an examination of the patterns of enrollment in and completion of postsecondary programs for incarcerated individuals. We found that Black, Latino, and other people of color participated in correctional education programs at a greater rate than White individuals while incarcerated. Rates of retention and completion once enrolled were similar across all racial groups, although Black and Latino students were slightly less likely to complete their degree programs. These findings were consistent for both professional/technical degrees and academic transfer degrees.

This report also includes a review of national research literature identifying challenges that may inhibit participation in postsecondary programs and best practices that may promote access. We found that Washington already implements many useful practices, chiefly the coordination between the Department of Corrections, community colleges, and other stakeholders and reentry services for formerly incarcerated students. Though barriers to participation still exist, often around funding, eligibility, and course quality, we found that these challenges would not generally limit participation for incarcerated students of color uniquely. However, some policies, particularly those related to student eligibility factors, may indirectly contribute to inequities.

Report ID: 21-06-1901
Related:

Filter By Topic
Benefit-cost analysis
Cannabis
Children’s services
Criminal justice: Adult corrections
Criminal justice: Juvenile justice
Employment/Welfare
General government
Health care
Higher education
Inventories
Mental health
Pre-K-12 education
Prevention
Public health
Substance abuse
Transportation

Filter By Author
Devin Bales
Madeline Barch
Julia Cramer
Rebecca Goodvin
Michael Hirsch
Chasya Hoagland
Lauren Knoth
Stephanie Lee
Marna Miller
Catherine Nicolai
Amani Rashid
Paige Wanner
Eva Westley
(show all authors)