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Washington State Institute for Public Policy
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Found 768 results:

2 web pages

17 current projects

618 publications (perform this search on the Publications page)

131 benefit cost results (perform this search on the Benefit Cost page)

Cesarean section reduction programs: Audit and feedback (private pay population)

...audit and feedback is a physician-centered approach to reducing cesarean section rates by reviewing cesarean sections for their appropriateness according to pre-established guidelines. these interventions vary in the frequency with which the audits are performed and the feedback provided. there is also variation in whether information is provided anonymously or if physicians or departments are associated with their cesarean section rates. the benefits presented in the benefit-cost analysis are specific to the privately insured population. ...

Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) for engaging clients in treatment

...community reinforcement and family training (craft) is a program for significant others and family members of those with substance abuse or dependence. in 12 to 14 ndividual sessions, family and friends are taught effective strategies for helping their loved one to change, to enroll in treatment, to feel better themselves....

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) for individuals with serious mental illness

...these studies assess the individual placement and support (ips) model of supported employment compared with typical vocational services for individuals with serious mental illness. the ips model focuses on competitive employment, client interests, rapid job placement, and ongoing support by employment specialists. in contrast, the comparison groups typically received vocational services that focused on building job skills before employment placement....

Resources, Education, and Care in the Home (REACH-Futures)

...resources, education, and care in the home (reach-futures) is a home visiting program designed to reduce infant mortality and morbidity among low-income families. home visits are made by a nurse and community worker during the first year after the birth of a child. community workers conduct the first home visits two weeks after the child’s birth and make regular contact with the families thereafter through home visits or by phone. the nurse accompanies the community worker on home visits at 1, 6, and 12 months to conduct infant health care and developmental screenings. in the included study, participating families typically received five home visits and seven phone contacts during the 12-month intervention....

Text message reminders (for high school students and graduates)

...text message reminders target college-intending high school students and graduates. students receive automated text message reminders on financial aid and college enrollment tasks as well as prompts to reach out for help from designated organizations and counselors if needed. the duration of programs varied between six weeks and six months prior to a student’s expected fall term in college....

Learning communities—linked developmental and college courses (for 2-year college students)

...linked learning communities co-enroll undergraduate students in two or more courses with the aim to improve academic achievement through increased social and curricular integration. learning community instructors, sometimes with assistance from a coordinator, integrate curricula by creating lesson plans and shared assignments that facilitate collaboration among students and connections between courses. in this meta-analysis, students were in their first year at a community college and required developmental education. student cohorts were co-enrolled in a developmental english, math, or reading course linked with at least one other course, typically a college-level course (e.g. english composition or american history). in all programs, students were enrolled in a learning community for one semester. while a model of linking developmental education with college level courses exists in all studies examined, there was some variation. some linked a developmental education course with one or more courses, while others provided additional supports like tutoring and vouchers for textbooks. there was also varying levels of collaboration and curricular integration between instructors, coordinators, and school faculty across studies. students were enrolled in a learning community for one semester....

Need-based grants (for high school students and graduates)

...need-based grants provide means-tested financial assistance to low-income students. need-based grants can come from many sources and in various forms. in this meta-analysis, we focus on need-based federal and state grants with minimal eligibility requirements. example programs in this review include the federal pell grant program and state grant programs similar to washington’s state need grant. grants funded by private entities may also be included if their implementation is similar to that of federal and state need-based grants. we exclude institutional need-based aid, as well as other grant programs that have conditions for aid receipt other than income (such as work study programs or merit-based aid). the studies in this meta-analysis evaluate the effects of need-based grants for students who are still attending high school or have recently graduated high school and have not yet enrolled in college....

Functional Family Probation and Parole (FFP) for court-involved/post-release youth

...functional family probation and parole (ffp) is a case management program modeled after functional family therapy (fft). ffp was designed to supervise youth in the community on probation or parole. like fft, ffp is a structured, family-based intervention that uses a multi-step approach to enhance protective factors (e.g., school attendance) and reduce risk factors (e.g., antisocial attitudes) in the family. the five phases of this program include 1) engagement, 2) motivation, 3) identifying patterns of interaction within the family, 4) behavior change, and 5) generalizing positive interactions to new situations. each phase helps to support incremental change for the youth and family. ffp typically involves 12 to 14 therapist visits over a three- to five-month period. therapists are trained by fft llc. in this analysis, ffp was delivered to youth on parole after being released from confinement and one study examined youth on probation. youth participated in ffp for an average of six months. comparison youth received either no treatment or treatment and probation as usual. although risk level was not reported in these studies, youth had some degree of prior involvement with the justice system. among included studies that reported demographics, 63% of participants were youth of color and 10% were female. ...

Parenting with Love and Limits (PLL) for court-involved/post-release youth

...parenting with love and limits (pll) is a therapeutic community intervention for families of children with serious emotional or behavioral problems including aggression, conduct disorders, chronic truancy, drug or alcohol abuse, trauma, or anxiety and depression. pll is designed for youth ages 10 to 18 in the juvenile justice, child welfare, or mental health systems who are at risk of being placed outside the home (e.g., detention, foster care). pll includes individual therapy for the youth, parent training sessions, and family therapy. unlike other family therapies, pll relies on a multiple family group approach with four to six families in a group setting and two co-facilitators for six to eight weeks of parenting training. in addition to group therapy, the youth and parent participate in 4 to 12 family therapy sessions approximately two hours each. in this review of pll delivered within the juvenile justice setting, most studies examined court-involved youth who received pll as an alternative placement from confinement, and one study examined pll as reentry into the community. youth were assessed as moderate to high risk for recidivism. youth received services over 6.5 months on average. court-involved youth received four treatment sessions per month over 2.5 months of service on average, while post-release youth received services over an average of 12 months on supervision. among included studies that report demographics, 65% of participants were youth of color and 21% were female. pll youth were compared to youth who received probation as usual and mental health services as usual. ...